Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Watercolor Chocolate And Almonds On Packaging

Watercolor Food Almond Chocolate illustration on packaging by artist Irina  Sztukowski

The watercolor illustrations of Chocolate and delicious dipped in chocolate Almonds that I’ve painted in watercolour for my client, are on the packaging and on the shelves of the UK stores.

Above is Dark Chocolate watercolor illustration of Almond and chocolate chunks.
And here is a sweet Milk Chocolate and almond dipped in it:

  
Watercolor Food Almond Chocolate illustration on packaging by artist Irina  Sztukowski

This Raspberry painted in watercolor together with deliciously dipped and tilted watercolor almond are mouthwatering good:

Watercolor Food Almond Chocolate illustration on packaging by artist Irina  Sztukowski

 And sweet but savory Salted Caramel Chocolate Almond watercolor illustration, is so appealing to my taste, I feel that I can grab it now from the shelves of the store and eat it all at once! :)
Salted Caramel Almond Chocolate Watercolor illustration on packaging


Contact the Artist

with commissions’ requests and for a quote.


Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Watercolor On Poetry Book Cover

Watercolor Dancing Fire by artist Irina Sztukowski on Esma Ashraf book Shamma
My watercolor painting Dancing Fire was selected by the author and publishing company for a wonderful book of poetry by Esma Ashraf.



From The Author: Esma Ashraf
Bio: I am a bilingual writer and have been writing since 22 years. In my language (Urdu) I was published in Urdu; Dunya international newspaper for 3 years. In English, I started writing 3 years ago and published a poem in Brown Girl Magazine last year. I also got published for ‘Art and literary Magazine’ in my college days. I have a graduate degree from New York university(NYU) in MSW.
Writing is my passion, it’s my way of worshiping. Playing with words is like making love. Not only poetry, I write short stories as well. With the power of imagination and magic of emotions, I create music out of my ink. I feel the heights of intensity starting to gush into my soul when my muse takes over my senses. Then a new story comes to life.

Idea of creation:
 it’s a book of poems. Shamma means, “a flame of the candle”. It is a desire that radiates us in many ways. The spark enkindles to raise a passion of love inside. Each new flame spreads light, whether we fly in ecstasy or sink into the downing tears of love. Shamma is also a romantic feminine name used in poetry, songs in Hindi/Urdu language.  She is a ray of hope, embodiment of sensuality and a sculpture of goddess. It is an identity of any woman who loves to give and sacrifices in the name of her dignity, compassion and courage. Her strength is her weakness. On one hand, a ray of fire burns her soul, on the other hand, this blaze enlightens her spirit. 
“I am the flame that brightens your dull moments, and I die in the hands of my own destiny.” 


Shamma: Desire of a flame

Many burn by her dazzling display.
Doesn’t matter; she chooses
to live this way.
Besides this notion, a mind
ponders anyway.
Dying under the moments
of shimmery days.
Love is enkindled
to let it stay.
Moth whirling around her
to convey.

Live to Create!

Monday, April 8, 2019

Peter Paul Rubens Exhibition Review

Peter Paul Rubens Self Portrait Painting Detail

Last weekend I visited an extremely interesting, informative, and beautiful exhibition of Yearly Years of Paintings by Peter Paul Rubens.

Rubens (1577–1640) was celebrated for his skillful handling of oil paint; his sensuous coloring; and his taut, action-packed depictions of dramatic narratives. Early Rubens focuses on what is arguably the artist’s most innovative period of production, from 1608 until about 1620. It was during these years that Rubens rose to the highest ranks of European painting. He did so through a series of social and artistic choices that laid the groundwork for his later international fame and established a visual style that would guide ambitious painters for generations to come. 

Rubens was not just a remarkable artist but also an international diplomat, businessman, intellectual, friend to scholars and monarchs, and master of a productive workshop. His early biographers branded Rubens as an aristocrat-artist, the favorite of Europe’s nobles, but his ultimate success was far from an assured outcome. Observe Rubens’s meteoric rise to master of the Northern Baroque.

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Rubens’s Italian Years 
After an eight-year sojourn in Italy, Rubens returned to Antwerp in 1608 to attend to his dying mother, and it was far from certain that he would remain long in his hometown. As he wrote to a friend, even the following spring he had not yet decided whether “to remain in my country or to return forever to Rome, where I am invited on the most favorable terms.” Italy was transformative for Rubens, both in terms of his artistic skills and his professional ambitions. While altarpiece commissions helped build Rubens’s reputation as a painter capable of communicating religious piety in large, public works, his skill in smaller cabinet pictures—especially scenes of ancient history or mythology—simultaneously broadened his appeal among individual connoisseurs. Our exhibition will open with a small but broadly representative group of works from Rubens’s Italian years that provide context for his later artistic triumphs.

These early experiences informed the social and intellectual circles that Rubens sought to join once he determined to settle in Antwerp. Through a selection of portraits—some commissioned, others intimate portrayals of close friends and family members—the exhibition addresses how Rubens sought to establish himself as a “gentleman painter” and how he acquired increased social and professional footing through his relationships with Antwerp’s heady mix of humanists, merchants, and religious thinkers. For instance, the Fine Arts Museums’ paintings of silk merchant Rogier Clarisse and his wife, Sara Breyel, represent a single commission around 1611, yet these portraits also testify to a widening network of relationships that touched the humanist Jan Woverius and the Dominican church of St. Paul’s and provided Rubens professional and intellectual activity for years to come.


The details of each portrait and still life are amazing:

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century

Detail of the Painting by Peter Paul Rubens beginning of 17th Century




Prints and Drawings 
During the 1610s, Rubens began to consider how best to publish his pictorial inventions through the mediation of reproductive engravers. Although earlier attempts had been made to reproduce his paintings, it was around 1619 that he began to cultivate relationships with specific engravers he felt could best translate his compositions to print. With major examples from the British Museum and Rijksmuseum, the exhibition will present the varied array of printmaking projects in which Rubens collaborated.

The exhibition culminates with a selection of Rubens’s large gallery pictures, works frequently scaled to compete with tapestry or fresco painting. Mural-sized works such as the National Gallery of Art’s Daniel in the Lions’ Den will be joined by other large, life-size scenes to create an immersive viewing experience. These were the paintings that fired Rubens’s international reputation as they began to enter the collections of aristocrats and royal advisors during the 1610s. This important final gallery will permit visitors to appreciate the size of Rubens’s ambition while also understanding the role his vibrant workshop played in his international success.









Live To Create!

Monday, April 1, 2019

Cherries - Aquabord Study

Watercolor Cherries Painting on Aquabord artist Irina Sztukowski

An art study of Aquabord. 

I love the texture, but it is not easy to paint on this surface; yet the decorative effect wins the prize and I think this small thick square boards will make a very good affordable gift for the art collectors that do not want to spend a fortune but still want to make a unique gifts to their friends and family. 

I love how it looks on the easel:

Watercolor Cherries Painting on Aquabord artist Irina Sztukowski

It is also very presentable when serves as decoration on the shelf:

Watercolor Cherries Painting on Aquabord artist Irina Sztukowski



Orange Watercolor Illustrations On Marmalade Labels And Packaging

Several month ago I worked on commission painting delicious oranges in watercolour for a large client, Fruitfield Company. And now tho...